What they say about us

My favorites are Arabia (Damascus rose-castoreum), Muschio di Quercia, a dry, uncompromising oakmoss and Legno di Nave, a very nice woody fragrance. All are very skilful, none heavy, trite or overegged. Indeed, many feel surprisingly modern, showing that there may be more life left than I thought in the pre-chemistry tradition..

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Luca Turin Perfume criticWikipedia

The finest ingredients, a master’s intuition: these are nice concepts, but how does it smell? Gorgeous. Dubrana has a very light touch with heavy scents, a flair for unexpected combinations (tobacco and roses, for example) and a gift for a kind of fragrant profundity that circumvents the usual categories of perfume (candy and flowers, musk and souk, greenery, spice rack) while somehow encompassing them all.

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Jim LewisNew York TimesNew York Times Magazine

The discursive, narrative nature of French-tradition perfumery appears most strongly when experienced in contrast with the work of Dominique Dubrana, a.k.a. Abdes Salam Attar, of Profumo Italia. While I’ve worn several samples of his compositions, they never seem to trigger much discourse, not because there’s nothing to say about them, but because they seem to invite contemplation rather than explanation…

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Denyse BeaulieuPerfume criticGrainDeMusc

Mona Lisa smells enticing, like a proper French perfume of old instead of a random mix of natural essences and yet retains a vibrancy that instantly makes you feel good, reassuring, leaning to smell the scent on your arms again and again and again in all stages…
How does Dubrana do it? He doesn’t say. It should remain thus: the enigmatic, sphinx-like smile of Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa.

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Elena VosnakiPerfumeShrine blogPerfumeShrine